Tuesday, December 08, 2009

RELIGIOUS STUDIES MA (in English) AT CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY

RELIGIOUS STUDIES MA (in English) AT CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
The Central European University is a vibrant, cosmopolitan and unique setting for the study of religion in a historical and comparative perspective. Situated at the crossroad of Empires and of world religions, Budapest offers a microcosm of the interactions of religions, cultures and societies.

Specialization in Religious Studies
The Specialization Religious Studies, offered by the School of History and Interdisciplinary Historical Studies, awards a non-degree certificate in Religious Studies. Students will enroll and receive their degrees in either the Department of History or Medieval Studies. As part of their MA in History or Medieval Studies, students of this Specialization will engage in the study of religious phenomena from a historical point of view, from Late Antiquity to modernity, and a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives. The Specialization Religious Studies is a young teaching unit, launched in 2007 by the Religious Studies Program. Its diverse course offers cover the three monotheistic religions multidisciplinary perspectives. To this end, apart from the Departments of History and Medieval Studies, more departments participate through their course offerings, such as Philosophy, Jewish Studies Program, Sociology and Social Anthropology, International Relations and European Studies. In the past, students were successful in receiving prestigious international scholarships and in entering challenging professional fields.

Religious Studies Program
The Religious Studies Program (RSP) is a research program and an academic forum at CEU fostering the academic study of religion. The mission of the program is to initiate and to coordinate research, academic events, and publications that address in critical ways religion-related questions in critical ways. The RSP is integrated into the School of History and Interdisciplinary Historical Studies and collaborates with relevant departments and academic units at the CEU. It crosses the borders of academic disciplines, confessional and geo-political categorizations. With an international advisory board and contacts with institutions throughout the region, as well as worldwide, the RSP provides an important site in Eastern Europe for academic research and communication on religion.

Source Language Teaching Unit
It is expected that as of Academic Year 2010/2011, students specializing in Religious Studies will be able to take intensive, high-level courses in classical and modern languages. The offering will include Greek, Latin, Arabic, Hebrew, Syriac, Ottoman as well as Russian and modern Turkish and Greek.

About CEU and the School of History and Interdisciplinary Historical Studies
Central European University (CEU) is a graduate, English-language, research-intensive university located in Budapest, Hungary, and is accredited in the USA and Hungary. While concentrating on the social sciences and humanities, CEU also offers programs in Business, Economics, Law, Environmental Sciences and Mathematics. With students coming from 100 countries, CEU is proud of its international community with no predominant national majority. The university offers small, seminar-style courses with student/faculty ratio 7:1, and individual consultations with professors. The School of History and Interdisciplinary Historical Studies brings together the Departments of History and Medieval Studies, the Nationalism Studies Program, the Religious Studies Program and Pasts, Inc. Institute of Historical Studies, as well as other research centers and programs related to the three teaching units with the aim to strengthen interdisciplinary studies. See: http://www.ceu.hu/node/2684

Faculty in Charge of the Specialization
Aziz Al-Azmeh (Department of Medieval Studies)
Nadia Al-Bagdadi (Department of History)
Matthias Riedl (Department of History)

Sample Courses
Approaching Religion
Bookish Traditions: Authority and the Book in Scripturalist Religions
Political Theology - Ancient and Modern
Christian-Muslim Polemics in the Middle Ages
Messianism - From the Age of Revelation to the Age of Revolution Religion and Authority Secularism and Religion - Comparative Perspectives on Christianity and Islam
Philosophy and Theology in the Middle Ages

Scholarships
CEU is committed to sustaining a geographically diverse and multi-cultural student body. To further this goal, the university welcomes financial aid applications from students around the world. Full scholarships are available for the Specialization Religious Studies. For more detailed information on financial aid, please visit www.ceu.hu/admissions/financialaid.

How to Start the Application Procedure
Students interested in the Specialization Religious Studies have a choice of applying to a One Year MA, Two Year MA or PhD. For research topics that focus on the period up to the end of the 15th century apply to the Medieval Studies Department (medstud.ceu.hu), for later topics to the History Department (www.hist.ceu.hu). Applications are accepted through an on-line system at http://www.ceu.hu/admissions/apply beginning on November 10, 2009. Candidates applying by January 25, 2010 are eligible to take the CEU-administered institutional TOEFL. Candidates who can provide evidence of proficiency in English or will organize their own TOEFL examination may apply by March 5, 2009. Full scholarships are available!

Application Deadlines
Deadlines for application to the CEU History and/or the Medieval Studies Department are: January 25, 2010: For applicants who wish/are required to take the CEU administered admissions examinations and /or are requesting exemption from the English language proficiency requirement. March 16, 2010: For applicants submitting applications complete with language scores and other applicable test scores. March 2010: For CEU Master's students and graduates applying to doctoral programs.

For detailed information about the academic programs and course, specific entry requirements, and a list of faculty, visit our website or contact us directly. Religious Studies Program Central European University (CEU) Nádor u. 11, room 211 h-1051 Budapest Telephone :+36.1/327-3000 ex 2170 E-mail: mailto:rsp@ceu.hu / Website: http://www.ceu.hu/religion RSP Director Nadia Al-Bagdadi (mailto:albagdadin@ceu.hu) RSP Program Coordinator Esther Holbrook (mailto:holbrooke@ceu.hu) CEU Department of History Nador u. 9, 1051 Budapest Hungary Telephone :+36 1 327-3022 / Fax:+36 1 327-3191 E-mail: mailto:history@ceu.hu / Website: http://www.ceu.hu/history CEU Department of Medieval Studies Nador u. 9, 1051 Budapest Hungary Telephone :+36 1 327-3024 / Fax:+36 1 327-3055 E-mail: mailto:medstud@ceu.hu / Website: http://www.medstud.ceu.hu You can also visit the Religious Studies group on Facebook.

Monday, November 23, 2009

Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies:

Wednesday, December 2 from 5:00 to 7:00pm
at Carnegie Mellon University, 237B Baker Hall (the long building across the bridge from Pitt).

An informal discussion with Pittsburgh faculty Allyson Creasman (CMU), Frank Toker (Pitt), Jen Waldron (Pitt), Dan Selcer (Duquesne), Adam Shear (Pitt), Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski (Pitt), and Peggy Knapp (CMU), all of whom will briefly describe their fields of interest. Graduate and Undergraduate students can see who's doing what, what courses will be offered, and what books are hot.

As in Plato's day, a symposium is a festive occasion implying food as well as conversation; accordingly, the roundtable will befollowed by a light supper for everyone who comes, so we can converse in smaller groups. Please rsvp to Peggy Knapp at CMU, pk07@andrew.cmu.edu.

Sponsored by the Pittsburgh Consortium for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

Friday, November 06, 2009

"Test Drive a Career"

The announcement below is from the advising center:

This upcoming Winter Break, Pitt students will have the opportunity to Test Drive a Career by shadowing an alum or employer.  Winter Break is an ideal time since your finals will be over!  What better occasion to participate in an a job shadowing experience that will give you the opportunity to shadow a professional and learn more about the potential field you want to enter.  If you are considering more than one career field then this is a great way to narrow down your options.  If you know what career you want to pursue, this is a great way to “reality check” that profession.

 

Job shadowing is especially important for sophomores as you will have to declare a major by the end of the academic year.  It is important to experience first hand a career field that you may be interested in before making this imperative decision.  Below are more details and instructions on how to sign up.  We look forward to hearing from you!

 

This is how the job shadowing will work:

  • You will be matched with an alum or employer near your Winter Break residence.
  • The experience can last from a half day to a full day of shadowing. 
  • You will earn OCC credit.
  • The shadowing dates are:
    • December 21, 22, 23, 28, 29, & 30

 

How to register:

  • RSVP to the Panther Shadow Program through FutureLinks.
    • Click on “events”, then
    • Click on “workshops”, then
    • Click on Panther Shadow Program

 

  • You must upload your resume on FutureLinks
    • Click on “documents”, then
    • Under the “documents” tab, then click “add new”

If you do not have a resume you can use the Resume Architect on FutureLinks or come to walk-in hours at the Career Development Office from 1 to 4, Monday – Friday, on the 2nd Floor of the William Pitt Union.

 

Email the following information to scottdl@pitt.edu – please use the subject “Panther Shadow Program Student”:

  • Year in school.
  • Industry/industries of interest – up to three.
  • Cities you will be near during your Winter Break that are an hour or less away.
  • Any dates listed above that you will not be available.

 

 

DEADLINE TO RSVP IS NOVEMBER 20, 2009

 

For any questions, please contact Danielle Scott at scottdl@pitt.edu.

Friday, October 09, 2009

Wittenberg in China

The following was posted on H-ASIA Oct 9 and will be of interest to those who want to study in China.

Wittenberg in China: On the Silk Road" summer program (mid-May 17 to mid-June).

This month-long program offers students an opportunity to explore China's past and present through a study of the historic and contemporary Silk Road through experiential learning activities, class discussions, and site visits. The program is flexibly designed so students can pursue their specific interests in business, medicine, education, art, religion, etc.. For example, Wittenberg Management students have received equivalency credit for International Business; art majors may complete their art history requirement; and pre-Med students can learn first hand about both traditional Chinese and Uigher medical systems. Students study as they travel along the Silk Road from Xi'an, Jiayuguan, Dunhuang, Turfan, Urumqi and Khotan; the program ends in Beijing. There are no prerequisites, and the program is open to all students regardless of their major or graduation year. Where translators arer equired, they will be provided. The program comprehensive fee of $4,780 to $5,780 (depending on number ofparticipants) includes all expenses in China (transportation, room, board,entrance fees, course materials, health & evacuation insurance, and anallowance) and six Wittenberg (four-hour) credits. Additional expenses arethe Wittenberg summer school application fee ($40), international travel,Chinese visa, and small gifts for Chinese hosts. Graduate students mayapply. For application materials, see www.wittenberg.edu/silkroad. Contact Dr.Marcia Frost at mfrost@wittenberg.edu or 937-327-7935 or Dr. Stephen Smithat srsmith@wittenberg.edu or 937-327-7506 or www.wittenberg.edu/silkroad formore information and application packets. Marcia J. FrostAssociate Professor of Economics & East Asian StudiesWittenberg UniversitySpringfield OH 45501

Monday, September 21, 2009

Grad School Fair

There will be an Idealist.org Graduate Degree Fair for the Public Good on Wednesday, September 23, 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the William Pitt Union, Ballroom.

To learn more about it, see idealist.org/gradfairs

Monday, September 14, 2009

Self-Service Enrollment

Starting this October you will be able to self-enroll for courses in the spring term. This will enable you to register, add, and drop courses at your convenience. The School of Arts & Sciences has provided the following information on how students can get started:

1. Log on the Student Center through the http://my.pitt.edu Web portal

2. View details about their enrollment appointment

3. Contact their academic advisors for a pre-registration appointment BEFORE their enrollment appointment begins.

As the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of Religious Studies, I will post later this month a sign-up sheet outside my office (CL 2610) so you can sign up to see me before your enrollment appointment.

Before you come to your appointment, please make sure you fill out two checklists:
"GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST"
"CHECKLIST FOR THE RELIGIOUS STUDIES MAJOR"

Both are available through the departmental website at

http://www.religiousstudies.pitt.edu/undergraduate/checklists.php

I look forward to talking with you about your future academic life here at Pitt.

---Clark Chilson

Wednesday, August 26, 2009

Career Kickoff

From the Vice Provost and Dean of Students:

"Career Kickoff with be held from September 14-18 and will provide students with a chance to network with employers and have their resume critiqued by seasoned professionals. Tables have been reserved in convenient locations across campus from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. each day to enable students to prepare for the career fair"

If you would like to learn more about this and the Student Employment and Placement Assistance (SEPA) offices, see http://www.hire.pitt.edu/.

Wednesday, July 01, 2009

A Peaceful and Orderly Transition in the Cathedral of Learning

Dear Religious Studies students,

As of today, I am relinquishing my duties as Director of Undergraduate Studies and closing up the Religious Studies advising office for the summer.

Professor Clark Chilson will take over as DUS and undergraduate advsisor for the department starting with the beginning of the fall term. He will post his office hours and contact information for the beginnning of the term on the blog soon.

In the meantime, if you have a question about advising--that cannot wait until the end of the summer--please e-mail Professor Chilson (chilson@pitt.edu) or Professor Orbach (orbach@pitt.edu).

I will be on leave in the fall term and back teaching in the spring.

I have enjoyed my time as DUS and I leave you in the capable hands of Prof. Chilson.

Sincerely,

Adam Shear

PS Two last notes about Peoplesoft which is not always up-to-date:

1) Prof. Chilson is the instructor for Religious Studies 1903 this coming fall term (2101) and not me.

2) A couple of you have asked me questions about the spring term schedule (2104). Although a "draft" version is now on Peoplesoft, this is simply the spring 2009 schedule carried over by the computer awaiting updates/corrections/deletions from the departments. Departments will submit schedule changes to Peoplesoft this month and next. You should not consider the schedule on Peoplesoft official until you get notification that the schedule has been published.

Monday, June 22, 2009

Harvard Divinity School Diversity and Explorations Program

Harvard Divinity School

Diversity & Explorations Program

November 3-5, 2009

“Exploring Opportunities in Ministry and Graduate Theological Studies”

What is “Diversity and Explorations”?

Harvard Divinity School’s DIVERSITY AND EXPLORATIONS PROGRAM is an initiative intended to increase students underrepresented in the graduate study of religion, with a particular focus on African American, Latino/a, Asian American and Native American students. The program invites applications from talented undergraduates whose background and experiences suggest a commitment to diversity and social justice issues as well as an interest in ministry, scholarship, or professional careers that are well served by the study of religion, theology, or ethics.

Who can participate?

Sophomores, juniors, and seniors enrolled in U.S. colleges and universities who have a commitment to diversity initiatives, social justice projects, faith-based programs and community outreach. Consideration will also be given to students who are the first in their family to attend college or those who have attended a community college as a part of a four-year degree program. Please note: Students who have already graduated from an undergraduate program and those who may be considering second career options will be considered on a space available basis.

How can I be considered?

Selection for the program is competitive. Students must submit a short application, a personal statement describing their interest in the program, a nomination from a professor, career mentor or faith-based leader, a résumé, and official transcripts. Applications must be submitted by Friday, September 18, 2009. There will be some grants available for travel, and all selected participants will be provided lodging for two nights and meals during the program. Travel grants will be decided during the selection process by the committee based on the numbers of participants selected for the 2009 program and the funding available. Information on the program is available at www.hds.harvard.edu/afa.

Schedule Summary / Program Information

Participants will receive a detailed itinerary at the time of admission to the program and again at registration. All meals are provided during the course of the three-day program. Some of HDS’s faculty, staff and departments will hold open office hours, including the offices of Student Life, Registrar, Career Services, Religious and Spiritual Life, and Ministry Studies. Program participants will have an opportunity to sit in on classes and meet current students, faculty, staff and alumni during meals and at other occasions throughout the program. Andover-Harvard Theological Library will be open to visitors and participants will be provided with information on events open to the public throughout Harvard University. The following schedule provides a summary of the program’s events:

Tuesday, November 3

§ Participants arrive throughout the morning and afternoon; registration; hotel check-in

§ Participants attend open classes throughout the day and HDS Community Tea in the afternoon

§ Participants attend an informal dinner with current HDS students, Diversity and Explorations alumni and staff. Diversity and Explorations alumnus to be featured speaker.

Wednesday, November 4

The second day of the program will include sessions especially designed for Diversity and Explorations participants as well as panels, presentations, and open classes offered during Theological Education Day, which will be hosted on campus to coincide with the second day of the DivEx program. The day’s activities will include:

§ Panels and presentations on HDS programs, resources, and student life

§ Information about admissions and financial aid

§ Open classes and panel discussions for visiting students throughout the day

§ An open house at the Center for the Study of World Religions

§ Lunch with faculty, staff and denominational counselors

§ Open office hours with faculty and staff

§ Campus and library tours

§ Pastoral Preparation and Ordination: Resources at HDS

The day will conclude with a dinner with the HDS dean, alumni, current students, faculty, and staff. The keynote address will be given by Davíd Carrasco, Neil L. Rudenstine Professor for the Study of Latin America in the Faculty of Divinity and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

Thursday, November 5

§ Continuation of panel discussions, including preparing for GRE workshop

§ Lunch with Harvard University graduate/professional school representatives and invited guests from seminaries and divinity schools from across the country.

§ Final day of the program concludes by 2pm

§ Check-out of hotel; participants return home


Note: schedule is subject to change.

Application, Notification of Decisions, and Registration

Applications must be received by Friday, September 18, 2009. Students will be notified by Friday, October 5 regarding their selection. Participants register on November 3 at Harvard Divinity School, where they will receive program materials and a detailed schedule of program activities and other events at HDS and Harvard University. Applications will be available in July at www.hds.harvard.edu/afa.

Travel and Lodging

Once the Office of Admissions has received confirmation of attendance, arrangements will be made with participants for lodging (local students may waive lodging). Participants who receive travel grants will work with the Office of Admissions to arrange travel. Other participants must make their own travel arrangements and notify the Office of Admissions by October 16 along with a copy of the travel itinerary.

We welcome you to visit our website at www.hds.harvard.edu for information about Harvard Divinity School.

Friday, June 19, 2009

Amazing April 09 Grads: Your Diplomas may be a bit delayed

A message from the Registrar’s office:

"As a result of the severe thunderstorms in the Pittsburgh area on Wednesday
evening, 06/17/2009, a number of University buildings experienced major
flooding. The University Registrar’s Office in G3 Thackeray Hall was one
of those areas. Consequently, all of the diplomas for April graduates were
destroyed. We are in the process of working with our diploma vendor to
reprint the diplomas as quickly as possible. It is anticipated that we will
be able to mail the reprinted diplomas on or about July 2nd."

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Congratulations again to our amazing April 09 graduates!

We received official notification today from the Dean's office that the Department had 14 majors and 24 minors graduate in April.

Something noteworthy and unprecedented: All 14 majors graduated with "Latin" honors: cum laude, magna cum laude, or summa cum laude, based on overall academic performance as undergraduates. Quite an accomplishment for the Religious Studies class of 2009.

Enjoy the rest of your summer.

Monday, May 11, 2009

Summer Business

Important notes for the summer:

1) Wednesday July 8 is the deadline for continuing students to register for the fall term without a penalty. But see below--don't wait that long or I will not be able to help you with registration.

2) Friday July 10 is the deadline to apply for December 2009 graduation in 140 Thackeray Hall. But

3) You can register for classes in a summer session up to the day the summer session starts.

4) I will be available for emergency advising (i.e. you need to register for the summer or fall) on an ad hoc basis in May and June. E-mail first. The department will not have an advisor in July or August (until the beginning of the fall term) and you will have to make arrangements with the A&S Advising Center if you need an advisor's signature on something.

5) I will be going on leave for the fall term and will relinquish my duties as Director of Undergraduate Studies. Watch this space for an announcement of the new DUS in a few weeks.

6) The department office is closed most of the time during this quiet period and pending the arrival of a new department administrator. We will post an announcement here once the office is back to regular hours. In the meantime, if you need to pick up a paper or leave something for a faculty member, you should make arrangements in advance with the faculty member or TA so as not to arrive on the 26th floor of the Cathedral to find the office locked up.

Thursday, April 23, 2009

Ossip Writing Awards

If you wrote a 1903 paper this year or another substantial research paper, you should consider enteringt this contest!


THE 2009 OSSIP AWARDS
FOR EXCELLENCE IN UNDERGRADUATE WRITING

Sponsored by the School of Arts and Sciences


The School of Arts and Sciences is pleased to announce our annual writing competition. Its purpose is to recognize and promote fine nonfiction prose writing in the Natural Sciences, the Social Sciences, and the Humanities. Cash prizes will be awarded for winning entries in the categories of Research Writing (projects involving substantial analysis of primary sources or data) and Critical Writing (projects involving critical analysis of a text, artifact, problem, issue, or experience—with or without the use of secondary sources).

The 2009 competition will consider pieces written for courses taken at the University of Pittsburgh during the 2007-2008 or 2008-2009 academic years (Fall, Spring, or Summer Terms). Submissions will be judged by the College Writing Board, and the awards will be acknowledged at the Honors Convocation.


Guidelines for Submission:
1. Papers must have been written by a matriculated undergraduate student in Arts and Sciences, to fulfill the requirements for a course at the University of Pittsburgh. Papers may be revised before being submitted to the contest.

2. For paper submission, please send or deliver eight clean copies to the Chair of the College Writing Board, Dept of English, 526 CL. The copies should be accompanied by one cover sheet listing the title of the piece; student’s name, address, e-mail address, and Social Security number; the name of the department, the class, and the professor for whom the paper was written; and the category in which the paper belongs (Research or Critical Writing). The title should appear on the first page of the paper; otherwise, the paper should have no identifying information.

3. For electronic submission, please follow the guidelines found on the Writing Across the Curriculum website (www.wac.pitt.edu). The title should appear on the first page of the paper; otherwise, the paper should have no identifying information.

4. All contestants must either include a copy of the assignment that prompted the paper, or attach a preface that explains the assignment in detail. (Please include eight copies for paper submissions.) Submissions without an assignment sheet or preface will not be considered.

5. The deadline for submission is May 15, 2009. Submissions will be accepted any time after February 1, 2009.

6. Fiction and poetry are not eligible for the Ossip Award.

Volunteer Nature and Social Projects in Israel

Dear Sir/Madam,

My name is Jonathan Gilben (Geography graduate from the University of Nottingham, U.K.) and I work with the Israel Nature and Parks Authority and other leading NGO's in Israel.

Together we run non-profit volunteer projects for the protection of endangered species & social aid in Israel, some of which promote peace initiatives in the region.

...we hope that your students will enjoy a unique opportunity to volunteer while experiencing Israel’s diverse cultural and natural environment.

The volunteer projects are posted at: goeco.org/israel

Please feel free to contact me for any questions you may have.

Thank you for your time and attention.
Sincerely yours,
Jonathan Gilben

GoEco
13 Rozanis St.
Tel-Aviv 69018, Israel
Tel: 972-3-6474208
Fax: 972-3-6485655
Cell: 972-50-5762797
goeco@goeco.org / goeco@goeco.co.il
www.goeco.org / www.goeco.co.il
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Cultural Studies Presenations

Done with exams and interested in a little more intellectual stimulation before your summer job?

The Graduate Program for Cultural Studies presents:
Graduate Colloquium and Guest Lecture
Friday, April 24, 2009
2:30-6:30pm
1501 Posvar Hall

Please join us for three presentations by students from Joshua Lund’s Cultural Studies Common Seminar, “Race in the Americas: The Biopolitical Turn,” followed by a
guest lecture by renowned philosopher, Roberto Esposito.

Program:
2:30pm: Graduate Student Presentations:
Josh Beaty (Communications). “Border Patrols: The Creation and Maintenance of the Israeli People through Film and Television.”

Alessandra Chiriboga (Hispanic Languages and Literatures). “Security against Life: The Guatemalan ‘model village’.”

Sarah Ohmer (Hispanic Languages and Literatures). “Performative Responses to State Racism: 'KRUMPing' in the HollyWatts and the 'AfroReggae Cultural Movement' in Rio de Janeiro.”

3:30pm: Refreshments

Please join us in room 2201 Posvar for some coffee and sweets.
4:00pm: Guest Lecture: "Time For Biopolitics" by visiting philosopher, Roberto Esposito (Italian Institute for the Human Sciences, Naples)

A Q & A with Esposito will follow the lecture.
The event is free and open at all. All lectures will be delivered in English. Please come to listen and to help us celebrate the end of the semester!

Writing Fellowship: Judaism and Social Justice

American Jewish World Service (AJWS) is pleased to announce that we are accepting applications for the Dvar Tzedek Lisa Goldberg Memorial Writers' Fellowship for 5770 / 2009-2010. AJWS Dvar Tzedek Fellows receive a modest stipend and write weekly Torah commentaries relating to the Jewish imperative for social justice. The Dvar Tzedek currently reaches over 4,000 people a week over e-mail.

To download the application for the fellowship, see here: http://ajws.org/what_we_do/education/publications/dvar_tzedek/dt_fellowship_application.pdf.
To see examples of the work of this year's Dvar Tzedek fellows, visit www.ajws.org/parshah.

We invite you to apply for the fellowship and to circulate information about the fellowship to anyone you think would be interested. For more information, please contact Lisa Exler at lexler@ajws.org.

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Summer Courses: Religions of the West and Religions of Asia

As many of you know, summer courses must gain a minimum enrollment in order to be offered. The time when the Dean makes the decision about whether to cancel a course is approaching quickly as we near the end of the spring term. If you have been planning to take Religions of the West or Religions of Asia during the summer term but have not yet registered for them, please do so now. The Dean's office will make decisions in the next two weeks based on enrollment numbers--for better or for worse, the Dean cannot read your mind.

E-mail me and I will register you.

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

REMINDER: END OF SEMESTER EVENT FOR UNDERGRADUATES THIS FRIDAY

This is an excellent opportunity to eat free pizza and get a preview of what kinds of research you might do in the capstone course (Religious Studies 1903).


Friday April 17: End-of-the-Semester Event for Undergraduates

The Department of Religious Studies
University of Pittsburgh

Come celebrate the end of the semester with
FREE PIZZA
and three short talks by the spring-term
Religious Studies 1903 students on their research projects:


Kara Birchard
“Enculturation: The Church Fathers on Women’s Roles”

Timothy Jackson
“Catholicism as a Minority Religion in Mongolia and India”

Candice Roberson
“Blood-Red Africa: The Evangelist Reinhard Bonnke
and his Mission to Convert a Continent”


Friday April 17, 2009, 12 noon-1 pm
2628 Cathedral of Learning

Questions and RSVP: ashear@pitt.edu

Sunday, April 12, 2009

Pre-Law Advisor/Liberal Arts Career Consultant Leaving at End of Semester

After April 17th, Angela Illig will be transitioning into a new position at GSPIA, as Assistant Director of Career Services, and will no longer be acting as the Pre-Law Advisor and Career Consultant for Liberal Arts out of the Career Development Office.
She writes: "I have enjoyed working with all of you and our students at the University in my role, and wish all of you and the undergraduate student population continued success in the future."

If you have already worked with her and have follow-up questions feel free to contact her (illig@pitt.edu) during this transistion.

If you are now seeking career advice for law school or other professions for the first time, please consult with Career Services to get contact information for the new Pre-Law Advisor/Career Consultant.

April 16: Lecture: "Texts and Rites for the Pre-Baptismal Period"

Lecture--Texts and Rites for the Pre-baptismal Period: the Mother, Child, Midwife, and the Priest
Thursday April 16
3:00PM - 4:30PM
1401 Cathedral of Learning
Audience: General Public
Cost: Free
Sponsored by: Center for Russian and East European Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Margaret Dimitrova, Sofia University, Bulgaria

Monday, April 06, 2009

Friday April 17: End-of-the-Semester Event for Undergraduates

The Department of Religious Studies
University of Pittsburgh

Come celebrate the end of the semester with
FREE PIZZA
and three short talks by the spring-term
Religious Studies 1903 students on their research projects:


Kara Birchard
“Enculturation: The Church Fathers on Women’s Roles”

Timothy Jackson
“Catholicism as a Minority Religion in Mongolia and India”

Candice Roberson
“Blood-Red Africa: The Evangelist Reinhard Bonnke
and his Mission to Convert a Continent”


Friday April 17, 2009, 12 noon-1 pm
2628 Cathedral of Learning

Questions and RSVP: ashear@pitt.edu

Wednesday April 8: DEPARTMENT COLLOQUIUM

Religion and Civil Society Actors in International Development: A Report on the Early Stages of a Project on Religion, Political Voice, and Accountability

Paul J. Nelson, Associate Professor of International Development, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh

Noon, 2628 Cathedral of Learning
Department of Religious Studies Brown Bag Lunch Colloquium

Paul Nelson's research interests include non-governmental organizations; transparency in international organizations; religion and civil society; and human rights and development. Coauthor of New Rights Advocacy: Changing Strategies of Development and Human Rights NGOs [with Ellen Dorsey] (Georgetown University Press, 2008), Dr. Nelson is currently working on "Religious Institutions and Voices in International Development," funded by the Henry Luce Foundation (2008-2011).

Friday April 10: Lecture "Resistance in the Minsk Ghetto"

Department of Sociology
Pittsburgh Social Movements Forum
Politics and Culture Concentration
present



Uncovering an Anti-Fascist Political Culture:
Resistance in the Minsk Ghetto

In the World War Two Minsk ghetto, a political culture of resistance was created under the noses of the German occupiers, on the basis of a Communist underground intertwined with networks of non-Communists, both involving links between the ghetto and the surrounding city. The inter-ethnic solidarity that flourished in Minsk during the war stood in contrast to the widespread abandonment of Jews elsewhere by local populations. In this talk Barbara Epstein will describe the networks of resistance that flourished in wartime Minsk and address the question of why solidarity was so much stronger in Minsk than elsewhere in German-occupied Eastern Europe. She will also describe what it was like to reconstruct an oppositional political culture, of which virtually no trace remained but the memories of survivors.

Friday, April 10, 2009
Noon – 1:30 p.m.
4606 Posvar Hall

Friday, April 03, 2009

An E-mail from "Nourish"

I'm working with Nourish International, winner of the 2008 North Carolina Peace Prize for excellence in cross-cultural solutions and sustainable development.

Nourish International is a student movement to eradicate global poverty. During the school year, Nourish Chapters run small businesses called "Ventures." The money they earn is invested in sustainable development projects that they choose. Over the summer, they travel abroad to work alongside their community partner in implementing the project.

To expand our impact, we're looking for students to found Nourish Chapters at their respective universities. Students who apply and are selected for our Chapter Founders Program will receive $500 in start-up capital, professional training and support in founding their own chapter and will gain valuable experience in the process.

Best,

Caroline Shedlock and the Nourish Team


=====================

In our world, as of 2009:

1.1 billion people lack access to clean water, 850 million people are malnourished, and 8 million people die each year because they are simply too poor to stay alive.

You can change this today.

Nourish International is a student movement to eradicate global poverty. During the school year, Nourish Chapters run small businesses called "Ventures." Using the money they earn, Chapters plan and invest in sustainable community development projects. Students then travel abroad to partner with local communities in implementing those solutions.

To expand our impact, we're looking for students on your campus who want to be a part of the solution to global poverty and challenge themselves in the process. These students will receive professional training and support as they start a Nourish Chapter at their school – building membership, running ventures and implementing sustainable development projects overseas.

There are several ways to get involved:


Apply to be a Chapter Founder – Between now and April 19th Nourish is accepting applications for its Chapter Founders Program. This spring, we'll be selecting student leaders from 10 campuses across the country to receive professional training, support and $500 start-up capital.
Tell a friend – If Nourish isn't the right opportunity for you, you can still help accomplish our mission of eradicating global poverty. Spreading the word to just three people drastically raises our chances of finding the right student on your campus.


About Nourish International

Nourish International was founded in 2003 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as the student group Hunger Lunch. Since incorporating as a 501 (c) 3 non-profit in 2006, Nourish has begun chapters on 23 campuses nationwide. In 2008, Nourish was awarded the North Carolina Peace Prize for excellence in cross-cultural solutions and sustainable development.

Since inception, Nourish students have raised and invested more than $100,000 in sustainable development projects in 14 communities worldwide.

Act now - applications are being reviewed as they come in!

Sincerely,

The Nourish Team
chapter.founders@nourishinternational.org
www.nourishinternational.org/founders



--
Eight million people will die this year because they're too poor to stay alive - You can change this TODAY.

Apply to be a Nourish Chapter Founder: http://www.nourishinternational.org/students -- next deadline is April 19th.

Eradicating poverty by engaging students and empowering communities.

Nourish International Chapter Founders Team
office: 919.747.3642
chapter.founders@nourishinternational.org
http://www.nourishinternational.org

Monday April 6: Lecture: Competion over Religious Sites in Bulgaria

MONDAY, APRIL 6

Lecture--Nature Cannot Handle Empty Space: The Competition over the Identities of Religious Sites among Turkish Muslims in Bulgaria
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
4217 Posvar Hall
Audience: General Public
Cost: Free
Sponsored by: Center for Russian and East European Studies

Hande Sozer, Department of Anthropology
For more information, contact Anna Talone - 412-648-7407 crees@pitt.edu

Monday, March 30, 2009

Friday April 3: Stuart Clark Lecture at CMU


Click on the poster to enlarge.

Thursday, March 26, 2009

Hail and Farewell to Judy Macey

Judy Macey, our Department Administrator, will retire on March 31 after a long career with the University of Pittsburgh. Please stop by the office in the next few days to wish her well.

Undergraduate Advisor Office Hours

For various reasons, I need to cancel my walk-in office hours on Wednesday April 1 and Wednesday April 8.

Please e-mail for an appointment if you were planning to come then.

Summer Program: Jewish Uruguay

HILLEL URUGUAY
SPANISH PROGRAM 2009


HILLEL URUGUAY IS OFFERING A ONCE-IN-A-LIFETIME CHANCE FOR STUDENTS TO COME—AS A GROUP OR INDIVIDUALLY—TO…

 Learn Spanish in the most welcoming country and Jewish community of South America!
 Meet Jewish students and young professionals from Uruguay, your Hillel, and other countries
 Immerse in a new culture and Jewish community
 Get academic credits
 Participate in a Tzedek-intensive curriculum
 Work in an internship
 Optional travel excursions
 And have fun!


THE MONTH-LONG PROGRAM INCLUDES

 AUDELE Spanish classes and all required materials
 Four star accommodations
 One kosher meal a day
 Transportation to and from the airport
 Participation in Hillel Uruguay activities
 Trips to:
 Buenos Aires, Argentina
 Historic Quarter of the city of Colonia del Sacramento, declared a Cultural World Heritage Site by UNESCO


IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Date
Monday, June 8, 2009 through Tuesday, July 7, 2009.

Price
$2,300 (U.S. dollars) per person, airfare not included.

Offered to
Groups and individuals.

How can you take advantage of this opportunity?
If you are a Hillel professional, offer your students this amazing chance to come individually or organize a group from your Hillel to come down! If you are an individual student or professional between the ages of 17 and 30, just decide to come down!

Limited spots are available

Friday April 17: Pizza and Research Talks for/from Majors

Come celebrate the end of the semester with
FREE PIZZA
and three short talks by the spring-term Religious Studies 1903 students on their research projects: Kara Birchard, Timothy Jackson, Candice Roberson. All majors are invited to eat, meet other Religious Studies undergraduates, and get a preview of the kind of research you will do as a senior in Religious Studies 1903.

Friday April 17, 2009
12 noon-1 pm
2628 Cathedral of Learning
Questions and rsvp: ashear@pitt.edu

April 8: Department Colloquium

The Department of Religious Studies
Brown Bag Lunch Colloquium Series
University of Pittsburgh
presents

Paul J. Nelson

Associate Professor of International Development, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs

University of Pittsburgh


“Religion and Civil Society Actors in International Development:

A Report on the Early Stages of a Project on Religion, Political Voice, and Accountability”

Wednesday, April 8, 2009
12:00 noon- 1 pm
2628 Cathedral of Learning
Coffee and cookies provided

Paul Nelson's research interests include non-governmental organizations; transparency in international organizations; religion and civil society; and human rights and development. Coauthor of New Rights Advocacy: Changing Strategies of Development and Human Rights NGOs [with Ellen Dorsey] (Georgetown University Press, 2008), Dr. Nelson is currently working on a "Religious Institutions and Voices in International Development," funded by the Henry Luce Foundation (2008-2011).

Junior Year 500

Religious Studies 1903 AY 2009-2010

Given the increase in majors in the department, we are currently contemplating offering a section of the capstone course (Religious Studies 1903) in the spring term next year (in addition to the usual fall term course). If you have not already spoken to me about this and you would be interested in taking the capstone (Religious Studies 1903, Directed Research) next spring, please e-mail me (ashear@pitt.edu) as soon as possible. We need to have a count of how many students we might expect for the spring term in order to plan faculty and course assignments.

Youth Minister job in Cranberry, PA

Hope Lutheran Church (Cranberry Township, PA) is seeking a student to help with our youth ministry program beginning in the fall for a period of one year, with the possibility of continuing beyond. We offer a small stipend for the students services/ministry. Much, if not all, of the work takes place on Sundays.

Sincerely,
Rev. Richard J. Leseganich
Hope Lutheran Church (ELCA)
8070 Rowan Road
Cranberry Township, PA 16066
724-776-3141 Ext. 203
www.hopelutherancranberry.org

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Job Shadowing Program at Career Services

Get a Competitive Edge to Prepare for Your Job of the Future
Learn about a field and gain contacts too.
An Invitation to participate in Job Shadowing with a Pitt Alum
Student Application Procedure and Timeline

Job shadowing is a one day observation experience where you go to the workplace of an alum and follow them through their day at an agreed upon date during spring break. The application process will be electronic through the Career Development web site, www.careers.pitt.edu. You will review the alumni by fields and select up to 3 in rank order that match your interest.

You should submit a resume and a (cover letter) stating the numbers of the placements
for which you would like to be considered (up to 3 in rank order) and a statement of why you are interested to the email link on the site. Transportation to the shadow site is the responsibility of the student.

The procedure will follow the timeline below. In order to participate, you will be required to attend a preparation session. When selected you will be notified by email. Alumni are asked to email you if you have been selected for the experience to arrange details. If you do not hear from an alum, contact the Career Development Office at imentor@pitt.edu.

The alumni will then telephone you to discuss what you hope to learn and to finalize the details. Give this some thought because they will be seeking your guidance on what you want to learn.
When the program is over we will ask you to complete an evaluation of the program, and of course, ask you to send a thank you note to the alum sponsor along with a copy to Career Development either by email imentor@pitt.edu or to Career Development, University of Pittsburgh, 224 WPU, Pittsburgh, PA 15260.

Timeline
March 24 – Opportunities are posted on the Career Development web site for students to review.
April 3 – Application submission deadline for students
April 10 - Deadline for matching (You will be notified if matched or not.)
April 10, April 13, or April 14, 12:00 pm Attend one Mandatory Preparation session
April 18 – Deadline for alumni to contact students to arrange the dates of the experience. (We are recommending between May 5 and May 16 if convenient for each of you.)

PANTHER’S SHADOW APPLICATION PROCEDURES

1. Visit the Career Development website at www.careers.pitt.edu and click on “Panthers Shadow for students” between March 24 and April 3.
2. Click “List of opportunities”
3. Review the list of opportunities and then prepare to submit your application.
4. Click the email address link and type your 2 to 3 paragraph statement of interest in the email or attach one that you have done on MSWord. Indicate the specific number of the placement(s) [up to 3] Attach your resume to your email and submit the application to the link on the site.
5. Once the applications have been reviewed you will be notified if you were matched and with whom.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Friday, March 20, 2009

March 30: Lecture "Justice and Taxation in Late Daoist China"

The University of Pittsburgh ASC, the China Council, the History Department and the Department of Religious Studies, and the Modern Languages Department of Carnegie-Mellon University, present

Dr. Vincent Goossaert

"Justice and taxation in late Daoist China"

This presentation will introduce the network of large urban temples run by elite Daoists in late Qing times (19th century) and the way they tried to maintain state-like functions notably administrating justice (though the gods) and collecting taxes (for the gods). It will also sketch the transformations of this 'second level of government' since the early twentieth century.

Monday, March 30
4:00-5:30 PM
4130 WWPH

RELIGIONS OF THE WEST

In the fall, Tuesday/Thursday 9:30-10:45 IS AN HONORS COLLEGE SECTION. In order to register you must secure permission from the Honors College, 36th floor of the Cathedral of Learning.

Religions of the West will also be offered in the spring in a non-Honors College section.

It is also being offered in the summer session.

Monday March 23: "Making Films About Things that Make You Mad"

Click on the image to enlarge it.

Undergraduate Research Fair: Deadline March 27

The University Honors College is holding its annual Undergraduate Research Fair on Wednesday, April 8th from 11:30-2:00 p.m. in the Ballroom of the William Pitt Union. For more information and the application form, please go to < http://www.honorscollege.pitt.edu/opportunities/undergrad-fair.html>.

The application deadline has been extended to March 27, 2009.

Thursday, March 19, 2009

March 27: Lecture: Richard Bulliet: "Clash of Civilizations or Islamo-Christian Civilization?"

Lecture--Clash of Civilizations or Islamo-Christian Civilization?
4 p.m.
104 College Hall, Duquesne University
http://www.cerisnet.org
Announced by: Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies, Global Studies Program

Keynote presentation for the CERIS Undergraduate Research Symposium. RICHARD W. BULLIET is Professor of Middle Eastern History at Columbia University where he also directed the Middle East Institute of the School of International and Public Affairs for twelve years. Born in Rockford, Illinois, in 1940, he came to Columbia in 1976 after undergraduate and graduate work at Harvard and eight years as a faculty member at Harvard and Berkeley. He is a specialist on Iran, the social history of the Islamic Middle East, and the 20th century resurgence of Islam. His most recent book before The Case for Islamo-Christian Civilization (2004), a brief interpretation of the current crisis, was Islam: The View from the Edge, published in 1994. His earlier books include The Patricians of Nishapur (1972), The Camel and the Wheel (1975), Conversion to Islam in the Medieval Period (1979), The Earth and Its Peoples: A Global History (co-author, 1997), and The Columbia History of the Twentiet!
h Century (editor, 1998). In 2005 he published a history of human-animal relations with the title Hunters, Herders, and Hamburgers, and his latest book, Cotton, Climate, and Camels in Early Islamic Iran: A Moment in World History, is scheduled to appear later this year. He has also published four novels set in the Middle East.
For more information, contact ceris@pobox.com

March 26: Lecture: Clark Chilson "How to Hide a Religion"

THURSDAY, MARCH 26

Lecture--Asia Over Lunch Lecture Series: "How to Hide a Religion: Dissimulation as a Transformative Process in the History of a Modern Secretive Shin Buddhist Associaton"
12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
4130 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/asc
Audience: Open to the public
Cost: Free
Sponsored by: Asian Studies Center

A lecture by Clark Chilson, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, University of Pittsburgh For more information, contact Jennifer Murawski - 412-383-3062 jennm@pitt.edu

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Seat Reserves in Courses

The Advising Center has sent a list of classes with reserved seats for incoming. freshmen.

I've posted this outside my office door.

Fulbright Grants: ATTENTION JUNIORS THINKING ABOUT STUDY ABROAD AFTER GRADUATION

Hosted by University of Pittsburgh Honors College &
Carnegie Mellon University Fellowships and Scholarships Office

Find out about the
Fulbright
U.S. Student Program
http://www.fulbrightonline.org/
Wednesday, March 25th
TWO INFO SESSIONS
1:00 PM, Univ. of Pittsburgh campus,
Frick Fine Arts, Rm 125
5:00 PM, Carnegie Mellon Univ. campus, Margaret Morrison, Rm 103
(same presentation at each session)

o Funding for one year abroad in over 155 countries to study or research, or English Teaching Assistantships in 37 different countries
o Eligibility: seniors, graduate students, and alumni
o U.S. citizenship required
o Presented by Vijay Renganathan, Program Manager, U.S. Student Programs, Institute of International Education
All interested students (and faculty) welcome!
(No RSVP required)

Contact Judy Zang jaz36@pitt.edu, or Julia Spencer julias@cmu.edu for more info.

Sunday, March 15, 2009

Summer Internships: Jewish Women's Archive

The Jewish Women's Archive is looking for you, if:
• You have a keen interest in history and the stories of American Jewish women.
• You want to learn from a dedicated and creative staff what makes a dynamic non-profit tick.
• You like working with new technologies to build interactive, online tools.

Internship Opportunities
1. Each summer intern will work within a specific department:
o Outreach Intern will help broaden the reach of the Jewish Women's Archive by working with the Film, Education, and Development departments to: market JWA's documentary on Jewish comedians, Making Trouble; identify new audiences for educational materials and programming; and expand JWA's community and network of supporters.
o Archives/Records Management Intern will work with JWA's Digital Archivist on improving the management of our 21st century online archive.
o Web Intern will work with JWA's technology team on projects to increase our website's efficiency and enhance recognition by search engines. Knowledge of XHTML, CSS, and at least one programming language (JavaScript, PHP, Perl, Python, Ruby, Java) required.
2. All interns will also have the opportunity to work on organization-wide projects such as blogging and creating podcasts.

You'll need:
• Competence with Word, Excel, etc. and willingness to learn new computer skills and software applications
• Online and library research skills
• Strong writing ability
• Ability to communicate via email and telephone
• Willingness to do wide range of tasks
• Curiosity, flexibility, enthusiasm, and a sense of humor.

Things you should know:
Internships at the Jewish Women's Archive are unpaid. (Interns may be able to receive funding or course credit for their work at JWA through their colleges and universities.) Summer interns work in our office for a minimum of 24 hours/week for at least eight weeks between June 1 and August 15. JWA is located near Coolidge Corner in Brookline, easily accessible on public transportation. Internships are open to all, regardless of religion, race, or gender.

Deadline: Applications must be received by Friday, April 12th. (Candidates applying for financial support from another source should let us know the date that a response is required.)

How to Apply:
Submit a cover letter, resumé, names and contact information for two references, and a writing (five pages or less) or, for the web internship, a coding sample to: internships@jwa.org. If you do not have access to email, you may send your package to:

Internships/Jewish Women's Archive
138 Harvard St.
Brookline, MA 02472

March 17: Lecture: The Veil in Islamic Societies

The Veil in Islamic Societies: An Historical and Social Overview
8:00 pm
Sutherland Hall Lounge
Audience: Open to all Pitt Students
Cost: Free
Sponsored by: Global Studies Program, International Studies Living Learning Community

Shane Minkin, PhD candidate in the joint History and Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies program at New York University, will discuss how the veiling of Muslim women has become a political issue of late. The French government banned the veil (along with other conspicuously religious accessories) from all public schools in 2004, sparking a series of protests. As recently as December 2008, a judge in a Georgia court held a Muslim woman in contempt for refusing to remove her veil. What, then, is the meaning of the veil? How did the tradition evolve? What are its links to the colonial Muslim world, and what might it mean to veil? This talk will provide an overview of veiling from pre-Islamic times through today. We will discuss the role of the veil in colonialism and explore the different types of veils throughout the Muslim world. Finally, we will link the discourse surrounding the veil to broader discourses surrounding questions of women and gender and the colonial and post-!
colonial worlds.
For more information, contact Veronica Dristas - 412-624-2918 dristas@pitt.edu

Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Upcoming Lectures on Religion and Society in Southeastern Europe

Wednesday, March 18, 8:00pm, 5401 Posvar
“Religious Education in Public Schools in the Balkans”
Zilka Spahic-Siljak, Visiting Professor of Religious Studies, University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Co-sponsored with Pi Sigma Alpha
------------------------------------------------------
Wednesday, April 1, 12:00 – 1:30pm, 4217 Posvar
“Golgotha and Resurrection: Destiny Myths, Victimization, and Nationalism in Early Serbian Cinematography”
Slobodan Naumovic, Visiting Professor of Anthropology, University of Belgrade, Serbia
------------------------------------------------------
Monday, April 6, 12:00 – 1:30pm, 4217 Posvar
“Nature Cannot Handle Empty Space: The Competition over the Identities of Religious Sites among Turkish Muslims in Bulgaria"
Hande Sozer, Department of Anthropology
------------------------------------------------------
Thursday, April 16, 3:00 – 4:30pm, 1401 CL
“Texts and Rites for the Pre-baptismal Period: the Mother, Child, Midwife, and the Priest”
Margaret Dimitrova, Sofia University, Bulgaria

Sponsored by the Center for Russian and East European Studies, part of UCIS.

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

March 27: Conference: "The Reception History of the Bible"

"The Reception History of the Bible: A Symposium"

March 27, 2009

9:30am - 4:00pm

Duquesne Union
Duquesne University
600 Forbes Ave.
Pittsburgh, PA 15282


Join us for a series of great paper presentations, including keynote
addresses by Dale C. Allison, Jr. (Pittsburgh Theological Seminary) and
Brian E. Daley, S.J. (University of Notre Dame).

Please see the attached flyer and visit www.duq.edu/receptionhistory for
more information.

March 16: Grad Expo

Come hear your teaching assitants give lectures:

GradExpo: March 16th, William Pitt Union

At the 9:30AM Sessions:
Session 1b (in Ballroom B): Peter de Vries. "The Apocalyptic Genre
Considered by the Light of Ricoeur's Hermeneutics"

Session 1d (In Dining Room A): Alexandra Seitz. "Arriving at the Proper
Moral Choice: Pittsburgh Catholics for Obama and the Question of Abortion"

Session 1f (In the Lower Lounge): Andrew Cole. " Baklava, Books, and
Boundaries: Religious Identity and Education for Eastern Orthodox Children
in America"

At the 11:15AM Sessions:
Session 2d (In Dining Room A): Emily Bailey. "Shoshin-Beginner's Mind: My
Month in an American Zen Monastery"


The schedule for the whole day's events is posted on the Grad Student
Organization website at:
http://www.pitt.edu/~gradexpo/schedule.html

March 21: Diversity Conference

The University of Pittsburgh’s Office of Cross Cultural and Leadership Development invites you to participate in “Archie Bunker’s Neighborhood: The REMIX” Saturday, March 21, 2009.

This conference will be unique as you will revisit the exclusivity of the late 20th century to then explore and redefine the dynamics of American society in the 21st century. The world, and your leadership within it, is changing. So we invite you to come and reshape it.

The registration fee has been waived for all University of Pittsburgh -Oakland students. So, please take advantage of the great opportunity.
The deadline to register is March 18, 2009.

For questions or more information, please contact Jacquett Wade at 412-648-9523 or by e-mail at jaw136@pitt.edu.

SENIORS: Take the SAILS survey on-line. Thank you.

What is Information Literacy?
The School of Arts and Sciences and the University Library System are seeking your
participation in a research study on information literacy to assess the skills of graduating
students at the University of Pittsburgh. Information literacy is the ability to identify what
information is needed, and to critically evaluate, locate, and use the particular information.
Results from this test will help us to design more effective course curriculum and library
instruction for Arts and Sciences students.
What is SAILS?
The Standardized Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (SAILS) is an online assessment
of information literacy skills. The test is being administered to Arts and Sciences seniors now
through April 17.
How to take SAILS
Students should log into the University portal at http://my.pitt.edu. To access the SAILS site,
have your browser configured to accept cookies. Click on the SAILS Survey -- Seniors
button. A short welcome message will appear. Click Continue to begin the SAILS test, which
takes approximately 35 minutes. Students must answer every question for the assessment to
count. If you do not have enough time to finish the test, you can log in later to complete it.
All responses are anonymous. At the end of the test, you will see a “Thank You” page. Print
this page and return it to your advisor to acknowledge your completion of the test. If
the "Thank You” page does not appear, you can log back in to the portal and click the survey
button to print the “Thank You” page.
Results from this test will be available in May 2009. For more information, consult the
ULS Information Literacy site at http://www.library.pitt.edu/services/classes/infoliteracy/
or contact:
Marian Hampton, Coordinator of Library Instruction
hamptonm@pitt.edu
412-648-7770
Pat Duck, Coordinator of Regional University Library System Libraries
pmd1@pitt.edu
724-836-9689
Information Literacy Assessment

Wednesday, March 04, 2009

March 14: Colloquium on Secularism

boundary 2, an international journal of literature and culture
presents b2 editors

• Joseph Buttigieg of Notre Dame University
• Stathis Gourgouris of Columbia University
• Ronald Judy of the University of Pittsburgh
• Aamir Mufti of UCLA
• Bruce Robbins of Columbia University

who with several Pittsburgh Colleagues will hold

A Colloquium on
Secularism

10 AM to Noon, Saturday, March 14, 2009
501 Cathedral of Learning

In 2007, boundary 2 issued a call for papers that produce a historical humanist critique of religions, especially faith-based or monotheistic religions. This call for papers rested on the assumption that a critical journal is by definition a secular project and neither legitimates religions nor aligns itself with them or their apparent secular derivatives. boundary 2 will provide a forum to discuss this "new critique of religion" that not only takes into account the foundations of ‘modernity’ but takes as its own starting point the changed place of religion in our world(s). We sought and published essays that describe, analyze, and historicize the implications of the ways in which religions work in the world today. Topics included the contrast between faith and reason; the manipulation of religion by secular power; the relations between religion and populism; the political actions that have made religions prominent again; and so on. These essays clarified the work religions do in their social orders and how critical intellectuals should best understand that work and best evaluate the worlds that they intend to produce.


[For information about this event contact Meg Havran (havran@pitt.edu).]

March 16: Deadline for the CERIS 2009 Undergraduate Research Symposium

From CERIS:

A reminder the deadline for student papers is March 16, 2009 for the CERIS 2009 Undergraduate Research Symposium, Islam in the World: Politics, People, Places. Please encourage your students to participate.

-----------------------------------------------------------------
Dear University of Pittsburgh Faculty,

I am writing on behalf of the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS), of which Pitt is a member, inviting your participation in an exciting opportunity for students to demonstrate their knowledge in an arena often not available to undergraduates. On March 28, 2009, CERIS will sponsor an Undergraduate Research Symposium at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh entitled “Islam in the World: People, Politics, Places.” Students from 28 member institutions are invited to submit research papers and then present their work to a panel of judges. Cash prizes totaling $500 will be distributed to the top three papers in each category: Politics & Policy, and Religion and Culture. A third category for artistic or personal presentations will also be held, but these submissions are not eligible for prizes.
On the preceding evening (March 27), a keynote address will be given at Duquesne by Dr. Richard Bulliet, Professor of History at Columbia University and former director of the Middle East Institute there. Dr. Bulliet will also speak directly to the students at a breakfast on Saturday morning before the Symposium begins.
With the 2009 theme of Islam in the World: Politics, People, Places, students may submit papers with topics such as: Dubai and the Credit Crunch; Hamas: Freedom Fighters or Terrorists; Fashion Fusion: Turkish Art and German Design; Rap, Rock and the Muslim Faithful in Indonesia; Muslims in American Democratic Discourse. Students should keep in mind that Islamic Studies encompasses many languages, literatures, and disciplines. It extends from the seventh century to the present, and includes broad geographical areas of the world. Islamic Studies can include but is not limited to history, religion, law, politics, sociology, science, art and culture, language and literature. Students from all majors are eligible to participate in the symposium. Research papers need not be written just for this symposium, but can be the result of work for current or previous classroom requirements. Papers should be 8 – 12 double-spaced pages; students should seek the advice of a faculty member to ensure the quality of their research and paper. Students will also be required to make a 10 – 15 minute presentation of their papers. We encourage you to support your students by attending the symposium on March 28, 2009, and ask that you consider serving as a symposium panel juror for participants from other campuses.
Information about the 2009 CERIS Undergraduate Research Symposium (including important deadlines, submission details, guidelines for writing, and judging criteria) are available at www.cerisnet.org. Please note that final paper submissions are due by March 16th.
With best wishes,

Doug Penhallegon Elaine Linn
CERIS Representative CERIS Outreach Coordinator
& Symposium Co-Chair & Symposium Co-Chair
Duquesne University University of Pittsburgh
penhall321@duq.edu eel58@pitt.edu
412) 759-4543 412) 648-2113

March 19: Lecture: Alicia Ostriker

Professor Alicia Ostriker

"Re-Deeming Scripture: Contemporary American Midrash"
Thursday, March 19, 2009
4:00 PM
Cathedral of Learning 144
Alicia Ostriker is a prize-winning poet and critic and the author of Feminist Revision and the Bible (1992), The Nakedness of the Fathers:
Biblical Visions and Revisions (1994) as well as For the Love of God: The Bible as an Open Book (2007). Her poetry has appeared in the New Yorker, The Nation and the Paris Review. Professor Ostriker is Professor Emerita of English at Rutgers University teaches in the MFA Program at Drew University.

March 18: Department Colloquium

The Department of Religious Studies

Brown Bag Lunch Colloquium Series

University of Pittsburgh

presents
Rebecca Denova
Visiting Lecturer, Department of Religious Studies, University of Pittsburgh
“And we got to get ourselves back to the garden.”

(“Woodstock,” Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young)

“It took Jesus a thousand years to die. Images of his corpse did not appear in churches until the tenth century.”
With this opening gambit, Rita Brock and Rebecca Parker have presented an in-depth analysis of the art and literature of ancient Christianity in “Saving Paradise: How Christianity Traded Love of This World for Crucifixion and Empire.” Simply put, they claim that their evidence demonstrates that the central tenent of ancient Christianity for a thousand years, that of manifesting God’s “kingdom” on earth (Eden), was replaced by a much later theology that stressed warrior emperors and empire, largely influenced by the art and religious narratives of violence and suffering of northern Europe.

Wednesday, March 18, 2009
12:00 PM
144 Cathedral of Learning

Rebecca Denova specializes in early Christianity and is the author of ‘The Things Accomplished Among Us’: Prophetic Tradition in the Structural Pattern of Luke-Acts (Sheffield, 1997) and “A Historical and Literary Understanding of the Passion Narratives in the Gospels” (in Passionate Dialogues: Critical Perspectives on Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ, which she co-edited with Daniel Burton, Mise, 2005). She is currently working on the historicity of alleged Jewish “persecution” against Christians in the first century. Prior to teaching at Pitt, Dr. Denova was associate professor of religious studies at Bethany College.

March 7 in Philadelphia: Medieval Music

If you will be in Philadelphia over break and find yourself in the mood for some medieval music Saturday afternoon, this is the event for you!

Please join the Rare Book Department of the Free Library of Philadelphia for an exhibit opening:

Cantate Domino: Medieval Music Manuscripts in the Free Library of Philadelphia, 900-1500
March 2 – June 26, 2009

Special Saturday hours and musical performance of medieval music by Quidditas:
Saturday, March 7, 2009, 1:00 pm-5:00 pm (performance at 2:30: duration one hour)

Location:
Free Library of Philadelphia
1901 Vine Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103
Third Floor

215.686.5416
or e-mail erefrbd@freelibrary.org

The Rare Book Department is open 9 am – 5 pm Monday through Friday
Tours of the General Collections are at 11 am daily.


This exhibition features liturgical medieval music manuscripts collected by John Frederick Lewis (1860-1932). Leaves and codices were chosen for their visual appeal as well as for their musical attributes. All of the music displayed is chant: a single line of melody. The Free Library’s collection is representative of notation from the 900s to the 1500s.

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

March 16: Deadline for CERIS Undergraduate Research Symposium

MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009

Submissions for CERIS Undergraduate Research Symposium
The CERIS Undergraduate Research Symposium is designed to provide undergraduate students at CERIS member institutions with research experience and an opportunity to develop presentation skills, as well as to provide recognition of excellent student scholarship. Total prizes of up to $500 will be awarded.
With the 2009 theme of Islam in the World: Politics, People, Places, students may submit papers with topics such as: Dubai and the Credit Crunch; Hamas: Freedom Fighters or Terrorists; Fashion Fusion: Turkish Art and German Design; Rap, Rock and the Muslim Faithful in Indonesia; Muslims in American Democratic Discourse. Students should keep in mind that Islamic Studies encompasses many languages, literatures, and disciplines. It extends from the seventh century to the present, and includes broad geographical areas of the world. Islamic Studies can include but is not limited to history, religion, law, politics, sociology, science, art and culture, language and literature. Students from all majors are eligible to participate in the symposium. Research papers need not be written just for this symposium, but can be the result of work for current or previous classroom requirements.
For more information and an application, visit http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/ceris/09Symp.html .

Thursday February 26: Lecture on Gratian's Tractatus de penitentia

Department of History, European History Colloquium presents:

A Treatise in the Spirit of its Age: Universality, Individualism, and Dynamism in Gratian's Tractatus de penitentia (ca. 1133-1140)

Atria A. Larson
4:00 pm
3703 Posvar Hall

World History Center Photo Contest

The World History Center is sponsoring a photo contest in an effort to spotlight global photography of the University of Pittsburgh students to exhibit in the Center for a period of one year. This contest is open to undergraduate as well as graduate students at the University of Pittsburgh. I have attached the flyer and submission form. If you have any further questions please feel free to contact me.

Thanks!
Regina McDonald Russian
Center Administrator
World History Center
3900 W. Wesley Posvar Hall
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
rpm14@pitt.edu
412.624.3073

Tuesday March 3: "Big Idea" Contest

Nine student finalists compete for $5,000
Network with Pitt alums, local entrepreneurs and program sponsors
And…vote in person for the idea you like best … help to select the $500 Wild Card Winner!
When: Tuesday, March 3rd at 6pm

Where: William Pitt Union Lower Lounge (large room with glass windows facing the Cathedral of Learning)
RSVP: Dr. Michael S. Lehman at mslehman@katz.pitt.edu
Bring a friend or colleague to help us build a powerful network with the movers and shakers in entrepreneurship at the University of Pittsburgh!



Big Idea Sponsors:

Allegheny County Economic Development
Blue Tree Allied Angels
Bridgeway Capital
Innovation Works
Meyer Unkovic & Scott LLP
PantherlabWorks
Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development
Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh
Wilke & Associates LLP

Friday, February 20, 2009

Medieval and Renaissance Studies Essay Contest

The University of Pittsburgh Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program is pleased to announce its annual award for


THE BEST UNDERGRADUATE ESSAY
in
MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE STUDIES


$300 in prize money will be awarded!


Eligibility:
Papers written for an undergraduate course in any discipline are eligible as long as they focus on topics concerning the medieval and/or early modern periods. The relevant dates might extend from the seventh century through the seventeenth century. Papers should be between 8 and 15 pages.

Submission:
Please turn in three copies by 4 p.m. on Friday, April 3rd to the mailbox of Amy Nichols located in the Department of French and Italian, CL 1328. Include a cover sheet with the following information: 1) your name, 2) title of paper 3) course name and semester taken, and 4) instructor’s name. Note that only the title of your paper (not your name or the course name) should appear in the body of the paper.

Questions? Please contact MRST Director Jennifer Waldron (jwaldron@pitt.edu)

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Advising and Registration Appointments

Sign-up sheets are now posted outside my office door, 2603 CL.

Tuesday, February 17, 2009

Congratulations to Nate Hilberg

Many of you know Dr. Nate Hilberg as an advisor in the Honors College and as a part-time instructor for the department. Please join the department in congratulating him on the publication of his book:
Religious Truth and Religious Diversity(Peter Lang, 2009).

http://www.peterlang.com/index.cfm?vID=310335&vLang=E&vHR=1&vUR=2&vUUR=1
http://www.peterlang.com/LOCALPDF/Buecher/BookDetail_310335.pdf?CFID=131849515&CFTOKEN=70406280

February 23: Lecture: David W. Montgomery: "Islam and Authority in the Kyrgyz Republic"

University of Pittsburgh
Department of Anthropology
presents

David W. Montgomery
Postdoctoral Fellow, Religion, Conflict and Peacebuilding Initiative
Emory University

“Experience, Morality, Islam, and Authority in the Kyrgyz Republic (With
a Comparative Note on Albania)”

Monday, February 23, 2009
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Anthropology Lounge
3106 WWPH

The reemerging presence of religion in Central Asia has led political
leaders to view increased Islamic practice as a "radical" threat to the
state. This fear creates a discourse of danger that caricatures banned
Islamic groups in the Kyrgyz Republic yet ignores how experience frames
understandings of morality, the legitimacy of authority, and the structures
drawn upon to maintain local order. Attending to experience as a category
of analysis makes sense of a "radical" turn from corrupt civil law to
tradition or religion, and reveals how local knowledge animates and
regulates everyday life.

Present your research in Harrisburg!

The University of Pittsburgh will select 3 undergraduate students to participate in
Undergraduate Research at the Capitol, a poster conference in Harrisburg, PA,
on Tuesday, March 24, 2009. All expenses will be covered for the 3 students chosen to
participate. All participants are from universities and colleges in the Commonwealth.
Date: Tuesday, March 24, 2009
(Students will travel to Harrisburg and stay overnight on Mar. 23)
Location: East Wing Rotunda, Capitol Building, Harrisburg
Time: 8:00am – 4:00pm
Activities: Poster Session, Recognition in the House Chamber, Presentation
on the Legislative Process, Meetings with Legislators.
Poster Size: 4-feet wide by 3-feet tall; a template will be provided.
To be considered for participation, submit requested information in a MS-Word file to
Professor Grabowski (joeg@pitt.edu) by Monday, March 2, 2009, 5:00pm.
Students selected will be notified on Tuesday, March 3, 2009, and will work with Prof.
Grabowski to prepare their materials for submission to the conference by Friday, March 6,
2009.
Interested students are encouraged to contact Professor Grabowski immediately, even if their
abstract and contact information are not yet prepared.
REQUIRED SUBMISSION INFORMATION AND FORMAT
Abstract Format
Title (All CAPITAL letters, no italics except for
foreign words):
Name of Author(s):
Name of Advisor(s):
Department, Institution:
Research Sponsor (if different from
Institution):
Abstract (150-200 words, all in sentences, no
bold or underline, no references, no italics
except for foreign words):
Contact Information
(Main Student Presenter Only)
Name:
Phone:
Email Address:
Permanent Address:
Campus Mailing Address:
Academic Major:
Year of Study:
Special Needs:
Institution Name:
Name of Faculty Mentor or Advisor:
Advisor’s Phone:
Advisor’s Email Address:

Career Shadow Program

Get a Competitive Edge to Prepare for Your Job of the Future
Learn about a field and gain contacts too.
An Invitation to participate in Job Shadowing with a Pitt Alum
Student Application Procedure and Timeline

Job shadowing is a one day observation experience where you go to the workplace of an alum and follow them through their day at an agreed upon date during spring break. The application process will be electronic through the Career Development web site, www.careers.pitt.edu. You will review the alumni by fields and select up to 3 in rank order that match your interest.

You should submit a resume and a (cover letter) stating the numbers of the placements
for which you would like to be considered (up to 3 in rank order) and a statement of why you are interested to the email link on the site. Transportation to the shadow site is the responsibility of the student.

The procedure will follow the timeline below. In order to participate, you will be required to attend a preparation session. When selected you will be notified by email. Alumni are asked to email you if you have been selected for the experience to arrange details. If you do not hear from an alum, contact the Career Development Office at imentor@pitt.edu.

The alumni will then telephone you to discuss what you hope to learn and to finalize the details. Give this some thought because they will be seeking your guidance on what you want to learn.
When the program is over we will ask you to complete an evaluation of the program, and of course, ask you to send a thank you note to the alum sponsor along with a copy to Career Development either by email imentor@pitt.edu or to Career Development, University of Pittsburgh, 224 WPU, Pittsburgh, PA 15260.

Timeline
February 6 – Opportunities are posted on the Career Development web site for students to review.
February 20 – Application submission deadline for students
February 27 - Deadline for matching (You will be notified if matched or not.)
February 27, or March 2 12:00 pm Attend one Mandatory Preparation session
March 5 – Deadline for alumni to contact students to arrange the dates of the experience. (We are recommending spring break week, March 9 – 13 if convenient for each of you.

PANTHER’S SHADOW APPLICATION PROCEDURES

1. Visit the Career Development website at www.careers.pitt.edu and click on “Panthers Shadow for students” between February 6 and February 20.
2. Click “List of opportunities”
3. Review the list of opportunities and then prepare to submit your application.
4. Click the email address link and type your 2 to 3 paragraph statement of interest in the email or attach one that you have done on MSWord. Indicate the specific number of the placement(s) [up to 3] Attach your resume to your email and submit the application to the link on the site.
5. Once the applications have been reviewed you will be notified if you were matched and with whom.

February 19: Hannah Johnson lecture: "Allegories of Violence: The Medieval Ritual Murder Accusation and Scholarly Projects of Memory"

The University of Pittsburgh Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program presents


Hannah Johnson
(Department of English, University of Pittsburgh)


“Allegories of Violence:
The Medieval Ritual Murder Accusation and Scholarly
Projects of Memory”


Thursday, February 19th
4:30 p.m.
Cathedral of Learning
Room 501


Hannah R. Johnson earned her Ph.D. from Princeton University after receiving an M.A. in Medieval Studies from the University of York (UK). Her teaching and research interests encompass medieval historical writing and modern historiography, contemporary philosophies of history, and the literary aspects of medieval cultural forms committed to truth-telling projects, such as saints’ lives and travel narratives. Her book manuscript, "Crimes and Libels: The Ethics of Memory and the Medieval Ritual Murder Accusation in Jewish History,” examines the intersection of ethical commitments and methodological questions in modern historical writing about the ritual murder accusation. Her most recent article, “Rhetoric’s Work: Thomas of Monmouth and the History of Forgetting,” appeared in volume 9 (2008) of New Medieval Literatures. She has been the recipient of a Mellon fellowship and several research awards.

Professor Johnson’s talk will be followed directly by the MRST Open House Reception
All Pitt/PCMRS students, faculty, partners, and friends are welcome!
Questions? Please contact MRST Director Jennifer Waldron (jwaldron@pitt.edu)

Registration for Summer and Fall

Registration for summer term is now open. To register: e-mail me for an appointment or come to my office hours or wait for your advising/registration appointment for the fall term.

Registration for next fall: Registration for seniors begins Thursday March 19 (if you will have 84 or more credits by the end of this term you are eligible) and for everyone else on Monday March 23.

Look for sign-up sheets for appointment times outside my office door (2603 CL) later this week.

You can sign up for an advising time before registration begins and/or for an appointment time during registration period. If you want to register at the first possible moment, schedule a meeting before registration and we will fill out a registration form together that you can take to the Registrar.

BEFORE you come to any meeting:
--Look over the major requirements and checklist on-line.
--Think about what major requirements and gen-ed requirements you have left.
--Look at courses for the fall on Peoplesoft AND on Course Descriptions.
--Take note of the 5 digit course numbers for all courses and associated recitations, labs.
--For cross-listed courses, take note of the 5 digit numbers for all sections of the course.
--If a course needs departmental permission--from Honors College or from another department, you must secure that permission before you see me for registration or before you take the form to the Registrar. (Remember that some RELGST courses are Honors College courses; even though you are a RELGST major you still need the UHC permission to take these courses.)
--If you have another major and you want to register with me, you should see your other advisor before your meeting with me.

Wednesday, February 11, 2009

Friday February 13 Honors College Lecture: Yoga as Sport

Yoga as Sport: From the Sublime to the Ridiculous?

Professor Joseph Alter
Department of Anthropology

2:15 P.M.
Friday, February 13, 2009
3500 Cathedral of Learning

Joseph Alter is a sociocultural anthropologist whose area of interest is
South Asia and especially medical anthropology on topics of physical
fitness, public health, social psychology, and the relationship between
health, culture, and politics broadly defined. His most recent book ? Yoga
in Modern India: The Body between Science and Philosophy ? received the
2006 Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy Book Prize for best English language book
on a South Asian subject by the South Asia Council, Association for Asian
Studies. Alter's talk for us will focus on the way in which yoga has been
manipulated to mean a large number of things to different individuals and
groups. While for some it is the sublime essence of transcendence, for
others it is a gymnastic, competitive sport. What does it mean for an
expression of cultural meaning to encompass such diversity of experience?
Do not miss this exciting foray into cultural anthropology at its best.

Lecture on Medieval History: February 26

The Department of History’s European Colloquium
Invites you to join us for a talk by

Atria A. Larson

"A Treatise in the Spirit of its Age: Universality, Individualism, and Dynamism in Gratian's Tractatus de penitentia (ca. 1133-1140)."

Thursday, February 26, 2009 at 4 p.m.
History Department Lounge
3702 Posvar Hall

Atria Larson is writing her dissertation “Gratian’s Tractatus de penitentia: A Textual Study and Intellectual History” at The Catholic University of America, where she has focused on Medieval history, philosophy, and theology. She is a co-editor with Uta-Renate Blumenthal and Kenneth Pennington of Proceedings of the Twelfth International Congress of Medieval Canon Law, and the author of several articles, including: “Bestowing Pardon and Favor: Emperor Henry III’s Pardons in Context,” (forthcoming); “Early Stages of Gratian’s Decretum and the Second Lateran Council: A Reconsideration,” (2007), and “The Evolution of Gratian’s Tractatus de penitentia” (2006).

Please join us for an engaging talk and refreshments.

Education Opportunity in New York

The New Visions for Public Schools–Hunter College Urban Teacher
Residency is a 14 month teacher-training program that fully integrates
the graduate coursework of the aspiring teacher (Resident) with
intensive, hands-on experiences in New York City schools. Within a
strong public school, Residents collaborate with expert educators
around all aspects of teaching and learning. At the same time,
Residents take graduate courses at Hunter College specifically
designed by UTR to align with experiences in urban schools. Successful
completion of the program results in a Master's Degree in Education
and certification to teach in New York City. Graduates of UTR are
guaranteed the opportunity to be hired by a school within New Visions'
network of 75 public schools and are asked to commit to four years of
teaching in New Visions schools after their Residencies. For the
2009-2010 Residency, UTR will be preparing 24 residents in English and
Science (Biology, Earth Science, Chemistry, and Physics) for grades
7-12.
www.nycutr.org

Friday, February 06, 2009

Student Grant from UCIS; Deadline March 15

Student Grant Opportunity - International Studies Fund Competition
UCIS announces the 2009 International Studies Fund (ISF) Competition. This grant program is intended to help students at the University of Pittsburgh to conduct research on international issues or in international settings. Full time graduate and undergraduate students at the University of Pittsburgh, from all schools and campuses, are eligible to submit a proposal. The maximum grant amount is $1,000; the application deadline is March 15.

For more information, please see http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/cgi-bin/events/ucisextra.pl?jid=3144
 

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