Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Educational Inequity Panel

There are more than 15 million children growing up in poverty. Less than 50% will graduate from high school, and only 1 in 10 will graduate from college.

Join Teach For America for an Educational Inequity Panel to learn more about how you can have an impact on this massive injustice on Monday, November 15 at 7:00 p.m. EST in the WPU Ballroom.

Date: Monday, November 15
Time: 7:00 p.m. EST
Location: WPU Ballroom

Featuring: 7 Teach For America alumni; one 2008 Pitt grad; two Pitt professors

This event is open to students of all years, academic majors and career interests, so please stop by and bring your friends. Food and drinks will be provided!

Monday, November 08, 2010

This Week's Global Studies Announcements


9th Annual Pittsburgh Federal Career Day Please join us on Tuesday, November 16 for the 9th Annual Pittsburgh Federal Career Day with over 60 federal, state and local government agencies represented. The event kicks off with a networking breakfast at 9 a.m. before the job fair opens from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.

This event will feature:

• Career Fair

• Keynote speaker

• Breakout workshops on the job search process

• Information sessions by select federal, state and city agencies

Where will Federal Career Day be held? Duquesne University, Student Union, 4th Floor Ballroom. Learn more about the University including a view of the campus map and driving directions. Who will attend? Government recruiters from federal, state and city agencies from across the U.S. and over 800 students and alumni from 50+ Tri-State colleges and universities. See Who's Coming: Check out the list of registered employers.

UNCF Special Programs Corporation̢۪s Institute for International Public Policy Fellowship Program The UNCF Special Programs Corporation̢۪s Institute for International Public Policy (IIPP) Fellowship Program is now entering its 17th year. The Institute seeks to enhance U.S. national security and global competitiveness by promoting excellence, international service, and awareness among a representative cross-section of the American citizenry.
The IIPP also seeks to broaden access to international education and training opportunities for underrepresented minority college students.

The IIPP Fellowship Program provides students from underrepresented minority groups with education and training experiences critical to entry and advancement in international affairs careers. Ours is a comprehensive program of summer policy institutes, study abroad, intensive language training, internships, graduate study, and student services that include mentoring and career development. Additionally, the Institute provides students with the education and training necessary to successfully enter, advance, and provide leadership in international affairs careers.
Application Deadline: February 1, 2011

Critical Language Scholarship Program 2011 Application Now Open -
Deadline: November 15, 2010
The United States Department of State is pleased to announce the scholarship competition for the 2011 Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) Program for overseas intensive summer language institutes in thirteen critical need foreign languages. CLS institutes provide fully-funded group-based intensive language instruction and structured cultural enrichment experiences for seven to ten weeks for U.S. citizen undergraduate and graduate students.
Students may apply for one language, and will be placed at institute sites based on language evaluations after selection.
Interested applicants should review the full eligibility and application information on the CLS Program website at Arabic, Chinese, Persian, Russian, and Japanese institutes have language prerequisites, described at

Boren Scholarships/Fellowships

The applications for the 2011-2012 National Security Education Programs David L. Boren Scholarships for undergraduate students and Fellowships for graduate students are now available at Boren Awards provide unique funding opportunities for U.S. students to study in Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East, where they can add important international and language components to their educations.

Boren Scholarships provide up to $20,000 for an academic year's study abroad. Boren Fellowships provide up to $30,000 for language study and international research. The application deadline for the Boren Fellowship is February 1, and the deadline for the Boren Scholarship is February 10.

Please contact the Boren Awards staff at or 1-800-618-NSEP with any questions.



Film--Global Lens 2010: My Tehran For Sale 7:00 p.m.- 9:00 p.m.
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium

In this riveting, insider's perspective on life in Iran's capital city, Marzieh -a terminally ill actress-'wearily relates her desperate quest for political asylum through a series of interviews with an unsympathetic government official. Beginning with details of her doomed relationship with an Iranian-born Australian and their plan to relocate to Adelaide, she recounts her struggle to work as an actress under Iran's current regime, her hope for a future ultimately dashed by the devastating discovery of her illness, and her need to "escape" the only home she has ever known. Set against the backdrop of Tehran's thriving arts culture, and framed through a series of artful and dramatic flashback sequences, poet-turned-filmmaker Granaz Moussavi boldly registers the trials of a modern woman struggling to flourish in Iran's contemporary political climate. This film is in Farsi with English subtitles
Audience: Open to the public
Cost: Free
For more information, contact Veronica Dristas -
Sponsored by: Global Studies Center, Office of Cross Cultural and Leadership Development


Film--Global Lens 2010: Shirley Adams
7:00 p.m.- 9:00 p.m.
Frick Fine Arts Auditorium

In this deeply affecting portrait of ordinary courage in present-day South Africa, a single mother-Shirley Adams -struggles to care for her paraplegic teenage son, Donovan, in a depressed district on the outskirts of Cape Town. Wearied but resolute, she desperately clings to him as he withdraws from the world following a suicide attempt, and is hopeful when his spirits are momentarily lifted by the appearance of Tamsin, a pretty but overeager social worker. But when the relationship between Donovan and Tamsin sours, his fragile emotional health declines, and Shirley's faith and perseverance are put to the ultimate test. First-time director Oliver Hermanus's observant camera holds close to its subjects, capturing the claustrophobia, intimacy and hushed anguish surrounding the tender daily routines of a mother and her child. This film is in English and Afrikaans, with English subtitles
Audience: Open to the public
Cost: Free
For more information, contact Veronica Dristas -
Sponsored by: Global Studies Center, African Studies Program, Office of Cross Cultural and Leadership Development


Film--Global Lens 2010: The Shaft (Dixia De Tiankong) 3:00 p.m.- 5:00 p.m.
630 William Pitt Union

In a poor mining town in western China, the stories of a father and his two children intersect and intertwine, illuminating complicated relationships hidden beneath the community's hardened exterior. Accused of an affair with her manager, the attractive daughter of the household finds herself spurned by her boyfriend and forced to accept an arranged marriage. Her brother dreams of being a singer, but after an unforeseen stint in prison, reluctantly heads into the mines like his father, who spends his days searching for the wife who left him many years ago.
Writer-director Zhang Chi's wise and poetic debut delicately expresses the turmoil of emotion and expectation wrought by a calloused and difficult existence. This film is in Mandarin, with subtitles in English
Audience: Open to the public
Cost: Free
For more information, contact Veronica Dristas -
Sponsored by: Global Studies Center, Asian Studies Center, Office of Cross Cultural and Leadership Development INTERNATIONAL EVENTS FROM OUR UNIVERSITY AFFILIATES mHealth Summit: Meeting 21st Century Goals Through Mobile Technology Research & Innovation November 8-10, 2010 Washington, DC The 2010 mHealth Summit is the key opportunity for leaders in government, private sector/industry, academia and not-for-profit organizations to share information and experiences related to the intersection of mobile technology, health research, and policy. Keynote speakers include Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health; Ted Turner, chairman of the UN Foundation; and Tom Wheeler, chairman of the mHealth Alliance, Core Capital Partners.
Registration is required.
The early registration deadline is September 24.

Protection of Civilians: Critical Liabilities and Their Solutions, Alison Giffen, The Stimson Center, Washington DC Wed., November 10th, Noon - 1:30 pm Room 3911 Posvar Hall Ford Institute Speaker Series, States, the UN and regional organizations face complex problems that undermine effective protection of civilians in war-torn societies.
Drawing on the latest research and
on her access to policymakers in the US government and the UN, Giffen will discuss current efforts to address deficits in guidance, doctrine and training. Giffen will illustrate her talk with examples from Sudan, Sierra Leone, Afghanistan and Iraq.
Alison Giffen is Deputy Director of the Stimson Center's Future of Peace Operations program, which is recognized as a leading center of research and advocacy on civilian protection in war-torn societies. Ms. Giffen has over a dozen years of experience monitoring and advocating on human rights and humanitarian crises in Sudan, Sierra Leone and Colombia. She received her MA in International Affairs from the School for International and Public Affairs at Columbia University and rceived her BA in Diplomacy and World Affairs from Occidental College.

"National Icon or Symbol of Islamic Iconoclasm?: A Brief History of the Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque", Mrinalini Rajagopalan Faculty Fellow in South Asian Studies, Yale University November 10, 2010 NOON, 2628 Cathedral of Learning On 15th November 2000 a small, angry mob gathered outside the compound of the Quwwat-ul-Islam mosque in Delhi, India. Celebrated as a monument of national as well as international repute, the thirteenth-century mosque, which is constructed in large part from spolia from Hindu temples, receives thousands of domestic tourists and foreign visitors every day. On this November day, however, the protestors (representing right-wing Hindu nationalist parties) demanded access to the mosque to hold a religious ceremony that would liberate the Hindu idols used in the construction of the mosque by the original Muslim invaders. This presentation examines the complexities of a national icon that is regarded as a symbol of India's glorious past on the one hand, and is seen as the embodiment of the traumatic subjugation of an indigenous Hindu population at the hands of foreign invaders on the other.

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